Specializing in minimally-invasive treatment


  Contact : South Florida 1-855-310-7246 / Central Florida 407-960-1717

Lumbar Stenosis: All That Matters

The lumbar spine consists of five vertebrae in the lower back. Patients with lumbar spine stenosis face no difficulties
while sitting. However, standing straight curtails the space available for the nerve roots, which in return, may lead to
the blockage of the outflow of blood. Blocked blood causes an intense ache in the nerve, resulting in pain.
Nevertheless, lumbar spine stenosis is a rare condition that if unraveled leads to severe nerve damage.

Lumbar spinal stenosis is a specific type of spinal stenosis associated with aging. Degenerative arthritis is the main
cause for lumbar stenosis. But, if the facet joints expand after degeneration, then it could lead to compression of the
spinal nerve roots in the lower back. The ability to perform day to day activities is affected, in the end, because of this
stenosis. In such a case, if the patient’s ability to perform the regular daily work reduces then surgery is the more
suitable option.

Fixing lumbar spinal stenosis can be done by medication, rest, postural changes and surgery. While postural changes
and rest are more preferable techniques, surgery and medication are the conservative measures to cure the stenosis.
Lumbar laminectomy surgery is the most widely preferred and successful surgery to fix lumbar spinal stenosis.
A surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis is suggested when all other nonsurgical measures do not work for the patient.
Among various symptoms, Lumbar stenosis surgery is most suitable for symptoms belonging to leg pain and least
effective in the case of back pain.

Physical examination alone more often not accomplishes a decisive lumbar stenosis diagnosis. Among other spinal
stenosis, a conclusive revelation about the disease can be made by either using imaging studies,  an MRI scan or a
CT scan with myelography.